Xbox One, the good the bad and the ugly. Mostly ugly.

To me the Xbox One so smells of corporate and a marketing think tank (I use the work think lightly)that don’t ‘get’ gamers.  It seems to be all about number gathering to sell to publishers than doing what the console was made for.  Games.

if Microsoft can prove that 80% of gamers play Call of Duty (HA! I said duty) then another CoD is made because that must be what gamers want!  

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Marketing TOTALLY misses the fact that games sell because they are good, then because it’s a part of a series and then because we’re told to.  It seems this time around Microsoft is relaying so much on the numbers. 

“Numbers are the path to Management.  Numbers lead to misinformation.  Misinformation leads to bad games.  Bad games lead to broken controllers.”

You can tell that marketing has taken over the Xbox IP.  Someone that understands gamers and the culture would know that this form of DRM will backfire and not be looked in a good light.  But, there will always be the fan boys and there will always be some demand, even for crap. 

Personally, I believe the Xbox One will bomb like the PS3 did in the American markets and Microsoft’s marketing team will be left wondering what happened.  But because they are management, they will never understand why because the ‘numbers’ back them up.

It’s good to know that Sony seems to have learned from their mistakes with the PS3.  They are coming out swinging this time around and using the Xbox One backlash to their advantage.  It’s too late for MS to change their marketing strategy for the Xbox One, all they can do is push forward as hard as possible and pray the numbers work for them.

Granted, to me, the ‘issues’ with the Xbox One doesn’t really matter.   Currently I pretty much use mine to play Netflix.  it is always online, even if I don’t use it daily.   I don’t tend to go over to a friend’s house to play games so not being able to share my game is a moot point. 

At this point, I might as well just buy a Roku streaming internet appliance and save like $300 dollars.

 

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SOE accounts hacked.. again.

Hackers compromise 33,000 SOE accounts

MMO industry, Legal, Miscellaneous

Sony’s hacking woes continue today, as intruders today have attempted — and, in some cases, succeeded — to access the giant corporation’s accounts. Chief Information Security Officer Philip Reitingerposted a letter on several SOE forums informing players that their accounts may have been compromised.

The good news is that less than 0.1% of Sony’s entire playerbase has been affected. The bad news is that that leaves around 33,000 SOE players — in addition to Sony Entertainment Network and PlayStation Network customers — whose accounts were hacked. Following the intrusion, Sony temporarily locked the accounts and is investigating the situation.

"Only a small fraction of these 93,000 accounts showed additional activity prior to being locked," Reitinger said. He assured customers that credit card numbers were not leaked and that any purchases made during this intrusion will be restored. SOE customers with locked accounts will receive an email with instructions on how to validate their credentials and restore their service.

[source]

How PS3 users can protect their rights

If you want to carry on using your PS3 online, you’ll have to give up some important legal rights — unless you read the small print and take action. 

One of the perhaps inevitable outcomes of April’s Playstation Network hacking scandal, and Sony’s delays in revealing that personal data had been compromised, is that several class action lawsuits have been filed. For those not familiar with the concept, class action is a request that, if granted by a court, means that a case can have a single lead plaintiff but anyone held to be in similar circumstances can be attached without having to launch their own action. If the plaintiff prevails, those attached can get damages on the same basis. It’s a set-up that corporations are very wary of as it means people are not deterred from the costs and hassle of legal action, and the potential payouts can add up to a fortune.

Sony has decided it wants to head off any future class action lawsuits by simply making legal action out of the question. To that end it’s demanding all users agree to a new condition stating: 

If you have a Dispute with any Sony Entity or any of a Sony Entity’s officers, directors, employees and agents that cannot be resolved through negotiation within the time frame described in the “Notice of Dispute” clause below. Other than those matters listed in the Exclusions from Arbitration clause, you and the Sony Entity that you have a Dispute with agree to seek resolution of the Dispute only through arbitration of that Dispute in accordance with the terms of this Section 15, and not litigate any Dispute in court. Arbitration means that the Dispute will be resolved by a neutral arbitrator instead of in a court by a judge or jury.

In other words, if you think Sony’s breached your contract or otherwise screwed you over, you must go to arbitration: by agreeing the new conditions you give up your right to go to court.

There are several key limitations. It appears the new conditions are only being used in Canada and the US. There’s potential for a legal challenge if anyone is able to successfully argue that online play is part of the deal when you buy a PS3 (meaning you have the right to continue using the service under the existing terms and conditions, though you’d give up the right to new features.) And Sony’s wide-ranging definition of a “Dispute” likely wouldn’t hold up: for example, it attempts to exempt itself from court action over breaches of criminal law such as fraud.

Customers must tick to agree the new conditions before continuing to use the service, but there is a 30 day opt out period. While you’d think that a fair system would mean that if you can click to agree, you can click to withdraw your agreement, but it’s not that simple. Instead you must mail a letter to SNEI, 6080 Center Drive, 10th Floor, Los Angeles, CA 90045, marked “Attn: Legal Department/Arbitration.” The letter has to contain your name and address, PSN account number, and confirmation that you do not agree to resolve all disputes via arbitration.

If you want to take advantage of this option, there’s a template letter available on Google Docs.

[SOURCE]

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Or you could just get an Xbox 360. 

 

Playstation Home revamp…

I find it funny that Sony is revamping Home to be more like an MMO.  Something that should have been done in the first place.
the revamp is to include game themed zones where you will take part in an over-arching storyline along with treasure hunts and other social gaming aspects.    hopefully you can ride the rides in the amusement Park area when the update goes live this fall.

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